Organic Seeds Edible Plants Organic Pest Controls Books Tools, Propagation & Fertilisers Sprouting & Microgreens Poultry Supplies Specials

Top

We will send an email to this address*

when is next available

* we will use this email address only for this notification and then we will delete it.
    CheckoutCheckout Icon
Postage & Packaging: seed packets(std,5g,25g,100g)=$7.50 or with other products: $12.95 for Qld or $15.95 for all other states more details.
Home
Good Bug Mix
An important strategy for organic gardeners is to enhance and maximise the natural biological controls already present in a garden ecosystem. Does your garden provide a nectar source for beneficial, pest-controlling insects? Planting particular flowers and herbs known as insectary plants has been proven to improve the natural balance and reduce pest outbreaks.

Good Bug Mix contains colourful re-seeding annual and perennial flowers including red clover, alyssum, cosmos, marigolds, Queen Anne's Lace, buckwheat, lucerne, dill, caraway, coriander and phacelia (when available), gypsophila. It blooms much of the year, providing nectar, pollen and habitat for wild and introduced beneficial insects, such as predatory mites and tiny micro wasps, ladybirds, lacewings, hoverflies, tachnid flies and predatory beetles. These beneficial insects or 'good bugs' are generally small with correspondingly small mouthparts, so they are only able to feed on particular flowers with suitable attributes. By providing a plentiful food supply the 'good bugs' live longer and reproduce more.
Australian Gardening Calendar
Penguin Adult Publishing 2005 (AUS)
The Australian Gardening Calendar is a handy small book that will become your favourite garden tool. Whether you own a few pots, a vegie patch or a grand garden, it's just what you need: an easy-to-use, month-by-month guide to garden care, covering every climatic zone from the tropical north to the chilly south.
Here you'll find information in spades, including: jobs for each month, what and when to plant, when and how to prune, what's in flower or fruit now, composting, mulching and being water-wise. 198pp

BA113
A Delicious Bunch: Growing and Using Edible Flowers
Linda Brennan 2017 (AUS)
Starting with some great basic organic gardening information (soil ph, pest management, container growing, soils, etc) this stunning book then presents some gorgeous garden plans to help you to incorporate edible flowers into large or small spaces. The bulk of the book is all about growing notes and recipes for thirty delectable flowers, which thrive in warm to humid and cool temperate climates (ginger, pansy, violas, violets, dianthus, roses, crucifix orchids, cornflowers, elderflowers, begonias and more all with recipes. 160pp, gorgeous full colour throughout

BD110
In this beautiful, unique book Linda encourages us to expand our thinking and bring a range of flowers from our garden, into the kitchen and onto our plates. Adding the beauty of these edible flowers to our dining tables not only increases our repertoires, it expands our appreciation of what our own organic gardens can offer.
Sophie Thomson Garden writer, author and presenter ABC TV.
Eat Your Garden: Organic Gardening for Home and Schools
Leonie Shanahan 2010 (AUS)
An inspirational book with simple instructions of how to achieve a healthy organic garden at home, school or community garden.
Includes practical details on
  • worm farms
  • herb spirals
  • tanks gardens
  • no-dig gardens
  • soil building
  • monthly planting guides
  • essential nutrition for garden and gardener
  • full cycle info from seed sowing to seed saving
Full colour step by step guide, 138pp

BE126Was $40.00
Garden Pests, Diseases and Good Bugs
Denis Crawford 2015 (AUS)
This impressive Australian guide is packed with more than 750 stunning and detailed photographs with easy to follow advice for anyone who wants a productive, healthy, thriving garden. With this guide you can identify the beneficials (parasites, predators, pollinators and recyclers), pests (insects and mites), disorders, deficiencies and diseases in your garden. Over 150 common garden insects are described in detail including great information on their life cycle, the plants or pests they target and the damage they cause. Encouragement of natural enemies is paramount while other control suggestions emphasize organic strategies where proven. 464pp

BG143
Grow The Best Tomatoes
John Page Revised Edition 1998 (USA)
A compact, comprehensive guide to growing, caring for and maintaining your tomatoes. Includes information on sowing, potting, mulching, pests, fertilising and controlling leafy growth. A section on supporting your plants provides many interesting alternatives to staking. After harvesting, how about saving seeds of your favourite type? Black and white illustrations. Resources listed are USA. 32pp

BG138
Grow The Best Tomatoes Booklet and Seed Pack Save $6.45
Includes an informative booklet and three packets of seeds: grow tasty tomatoes for salads, cooking and preserving. Tomato seeds: BG139Save $6.45
Month by Month Planting Guide: Vegetables
Keeping Your Garden Productive All Year

Stefan Mager 2011 (AUS)
We'd all love to have a garden that is productive all year round - here's a guide to help with that goal. This A4 size, 8-page, fold-out laminated chart is a 'sow when and harvest when' guide - it provides you with essential information in an easy to use format. For each month of the year in each of the four climate zones there are vegetables and herbs suggested for planting, along with number of weeks from planting to harvest. Work with the seasons and have a bountiful garden all year! 8pp

BM113
Moon Calendar Wheel
(AUS)
This is the simplest, most concise and useful guide to vegetable gardening by the Moon cycles we've seen! At the start of each month, align the new moon symbol on the moving disc with the date of the new moon for that month (just find this date in the newspaper or a website or diary). Then simply check the recommended activities for each day of the month - soil preparation times, ideal sowing or transplanting times, and fertilising times. Also includes companion planting tips. A4-size laminated cardboard. You will never need another poster or guide again with this perpetual model.

BC130
Grafting Fruit Trees
Larry Southwick 1979 (USA)
Ever dreamed of having multiple fruit varieties on the one tree, or reinvigorating an old orchard?
This compact booklet outlines many common methods in simple to understand, illustrated steps for the fledgling grafter with an emphasis on timing and techniques. An easy to follow guide for beginners, this booklet will save you heaps of money as you will be able to grow your own seedlings and graft superior varieties on to them or modernise and diversify your current trees with new cultivars.
  • Tools and dressings
  • Types of grafts covered:
    • Budding
    • Cleft
    • Bark
    • Inlay, veneer and rind
    • Bridge
    • Inarch
    • Whip or tongue
    • Stub
    • Oblique side graft
Although written in the USA, the techniques are universal. 32pp
BG146

Click here for grafting tools
Jackie French's Guide to Companion Planting
Jackie French 2nd Edition 2013 (AUS)
A completely revised and expanded second edition, this comprehensive guide to companion planting for Australian conditions has full colour photos and useful clear explanations of what actually works in the garden. Eliminate pests without pesticides and reduce your time spent weeding and fertilising by getting the plants to do the work for you. As well as covering veges, fruit and flowers this second edition includes new and informative chapters to cover soil fertility, the lawn and natural herbicides, as well as a diagnostic chart of common pests. 182pp
BJ108
The Seed Savers Handbook
Michel and Jude Fanton 1993 (AUS)
Excellent reference especially for tropical gardeners who 'miss out' in many conventional gardening books. Learn to protect our global food heritage - and eat it too! Detailed descriptions of seed collecting, propagation and kitchen uses of more than 100 vegetables, herbs and edible flowers. 176pp

BS104
Starting Seeds: How to Grow Healthy, Productive Vegetables, Herbs and Flowers from Seed
Barbara Ellis 2012 (USA)
There are many reasons to grow your veges, fruit, herbs and flowers from seed. In addition to being an economical way to get your garden started you have many more varieties to choose from than your local nursery supplies and your seedlings are adapted to the local climate.
This informative guide to successful seed raising, covers everything from germination to seed saving. There's advice on choosing and storing seed, watering, weeding, mulching and thinning seedlings. Learn about treatments for "special needs" seeds; how to transplant seedlings and protecting your plants from pests. There are illustrated instructions for making your own seed tape, newspaper pots and seed-raising mix. Great reference for new and experienced gardeners. An American publication with measurements in imperial, not metric. 122pp

BS141
Keeping Food Production Going During Hot Humid Summers
Green Harvest carries a range of seeds ideally suited to hot, humid areas.
Gardeners in subtropical and tropical areas face a range of challenges in the vegetable garden during the 'wet'. Pests and weeds can spread in the blink of an eye, with fruit fly and fungal problems being particularly difficult to deal with.
One way of dealing with this season is to 'put the garden to bed', by spreading a liberal amount of mulch and refraining from sowing seeds until the weather starts to cool down in March. This doesn't mean there is nothing to harvest, only that the harvest is limited to perennial, tropical edibles such as asparagus, arrowroot, bamboo, cassava, chillies, choko, ginger, kangkong, lotus, pawpaw, pigeon pea, sweetleaf, sweet potato, taro, waterchestnuts and yam. Many of these plants are available seasonally. Find some of them here.
Alternatively you can substitute more familiar vegetables with hardier ones that are native to tropical regions and will withstand waterlogging and high humidity without collapsing in a slimey heap. Angled luffa or New Guinea bean will substitute for zucchini without the powdery mildew problems, snake bean will continue to set pods during very hot weather and is resistant to bean fly. Ceylon or Egyptian spinach are both rust resistant and won't bolt too fast as the weather warms up.

The following plants suitable for warmer climates are available seasonally as tubestock:
Aibika, Betel Leaf, Brazilian Spinach, Ceylon Spinach, Cranberry Hibiscus, Kangkong, Mushroom Plant, Okinawa Spinach,
Peruvian Parsnip, Surinam Spinach and Tahitian Spinach.
Tropical Food Gardens: A Guide to Growing Fruit, Herbs and Vegetables in Tropical and Sub-tropical Climates
Leonie Norrington 2001 (AUS)
This excellent book is written in an informative, conversational style that is engaging and funny. Beautiful hand-painted graphics accompany the witty prose. This is easily the best book we have come across for northern gardeners. 160pp

BT100Reduced from $39.95
Home
Why Shop with Us Free Australian Organic Gardening E-Newsletter Contact Us About Us
  
Shopping here is private and secure.
Copyright © 2001 - 2020   Green Harvest Organic Gardening Supplies
No part of this website may be reproduced without permission of the owner